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New FMS diagnosis


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Read the full article here:  A New Way of Diagnosing Fibromyalgia

A New Way of Diagnosing Fibromyalgia
Pain Index Plus Symptoms, Not Tender Points, Equals Fibromyalgia, New Study Says
By Denise Mann

May 26, 2010 — A new way of diagnosing fibromyalgia, by using a pain index and a measure of key symptoms and severity, may lead to more diagnoses and treatment, a new study says. The findings appear in the May issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

Until now, diagnosing the widespread pain disorder relied mainly on “tender point” exams or tenderness to the touch at 11 or more of 18 specified tender points and widespread pain in all four quadrants of the body for three months.

But this method was not fail-safe, says study author Robert Katz, MD, a rheumatologist and professor of medicine at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. “Doctors just weren’t comfortable with tender point exams, and these points fluctuate over time.

“The trick to fibromyalgia is diagnosing it,” he says. “A lot of people experience widespread pain, but when do you give it the label of fibromyalgia?”

Fibromyalgia is based on symptoms, so X-rays can’t make definitive a diagnosis as they can in other rheumatic diseases.
No More Tender Point Exams

The new criteria avoid tender points and tender point exams. Instead, a widespread pain index coupled with a symptom severity scale is used. The pain index is a 19-item checklist; a person marks the number of body parts where they have experienced pain during the last week. The symptom scale comprises unrefreshing sleep, fatigue, and cognitive issues — three hallmarks of fibromyalgia. Symptoms are rated on an ascending scale of severity from 0 to 3. The diagnosis revolves around the number of painful areas, number of symptoms, and their severity. The American College of Rheumatology gave its stamp of approval to these new criteria.

Using the new set of criteria, “we will be diagnosing more people because we are casting a wider net,” Katz says. Fibromyalgia affects an estimated 10 million people in the U.S. and an estimated 3% to 6% of the population worldwide, according to National Fibromyalgia Association. “The number may double or even triple,” he says.

Fibromyalgia

You look fine to me

Living with fibromyalgia

WINNER OF THE PANDORA ADVOCACY CONTEST 2007 The story of a young girl named Holly Fraser, who has to endure a life with the incurable disease Fibromyalgia. more info can be found at http://www.diagnosesupport.com http ©2005 elfling productions http://www.elfling.c…

Diagnosing Fibromyalgia | this time ~ this space

Fibromyalgia is a syndrome involving debilitating pain, sleep disturbance, jaw pain, irritable bowel, headaches, and difficulty with concentration, anxiety.

Publish Date: 06/07/2010 5:33

http://thistimethisspace.com/2010/06/06/diagnosing-fibromyalgia/

Interesting Aspects of Fibromyalgia Symptoms | Help for Depression

The process of diagnosing fibromyalgia is performed mostly on patients’ reports of fibromyalgia symptoms and careful neurological examinations. However, there are also other ways of diagnosing the disorder. …

Publish Date: 06/13/2010 9:31

http://depressionhelpebooks.com/2010/06/13/interesting-aspects-of-fibromyalgia-symptoms/

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OBESITY AND FIBROMYALGIA

Obesity, Inactivity Increase Risk of Fibromyalgia |Weight Loss Surgery Channel

Obesity, Inactivity Increase Risk of Fibromyalgia

Obesity in women has been linked to higher rates of fibromyalgia, a condition that causes pain and tenderness throughout the body.

Researchers from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology have found a link between obesity in women and fibromyalgia, an incurable disease that causes chronic pain. The study found an increased risk for fibromyalgia in women who lead a sedentary lifestyle and have a higher body mass index (BMI).

Fibromyalgia (FM) is diagnosed when a patient suffers from chronic pain that lasts for more than three months, tender joints, headaches, unexplained fatigue and mood disturbances. Although the exact cause of FM is unknown, the risk for developing FM increases with age and is more common in women than in men.

Researchers analyzed data from nearly 16,000 women spanning 11 years. They found that women who exercised four times per week had a 29 percent lower risk of fibromyalgia compared with inactive women. A high BMI was also associated with a lower pain tolerance among patients with FM when compared to sufferers of a normal weight. Study findings were published online last week in the journal Arthritis Care and Research.

The exact connection between FM and obesity is unknown, and researchers are continuing their studies to determine the cause. However, they note that regular physical activity can help lessen the chance of developing the condition and improve overall health.

In a press statement, lead researcher Dr. Paul Mork said, “These findings, together with the current study, indicate that regular physical exercise, and thereby improved physical fitness, may serve as a buffer against the perpetuation of musculoskeletal symptoms that eventually lead to the development of FM.”

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Vibration improves balance in fibromyalgia

I found the following article really interesting.  I was diagnosed in 2001 with FMS and have poor balance which causes me to tumble at times.  I look forward to seeing how the results come out in longer studies.

Vibration improves balance in fibromyalgia

Vibration improves balance in fibromyalgia

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Tilt platform vibration helps women with fibromyalgia develop better balance, Spanish researchers have found.

Nearly half of fibromyalgia patients have poor balance, the authors note. While whole body vibration has been shown to improve balance, bone mass, and motor capacity in older people, until now there have been no controlled studies of intensive vibration therapy using a tilt platform in people with fibromyalgia.

A research team led by Dr. Narcis Gusi, from the University of Extremadura in Caceres recruited 41 women with fibromyalgia, ages 41 to 65, and randomized 21 to vibration therapy. The 20 women in the control group received usual care with no physical therapy.

The intervention involved 3 sessions per week for 12 weeks, with a tilt platform providing low-frequency (12.5 Hertz) anteroposterior vibration. Each session included a 10-minute warm-up of slow walking followed by six repetitions of vibration for up to 60 seconds each.

In the intervention group, two subjects quit because of scheduling conflicts and one because of acute pain in the legs, while two in the control group dropped out due to lack of interest.

In intent-to-treat analysis, the dynamic balance index improved by 36% in the vibration group but remained unchanged in the control group. Women with the worst balance and heaviest weight at baseline had the greatest improvements (p < 0.001).

In their March 16th online report in Arthritis Care & Research, the researchers say the tilt vibration therapy has the potential “to help reduce bone mass loss and improve strength and speed, which are critical for reacting and preventing stumbles and falls.”

However, longer term studies are needed to see if the results translate into clinical benefits, such as a reduction in falls or changes in pain thresholds.

Arthritis Care Res 2010.

Further reading on Fibromyalgia

Living with Fibromyalgia: new edition by Christine Craggs-Hinton

The Fibromyalgia Handbook: A 7-Step Program to Halt and Even Reverse Fibromyalgia by Harris H. McIlwain and Debra Fulghum Bruce

Fibromyalgia for Dummies by Roland Staud MD and Christine Adamec

Fibromyalgia: Understanding and Getting Relief from Pain That Won’t Go Away by Don L. Goldenberg

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Being a Parent With Fibromyalgia & Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Parenthood is enough of a challenge when you’re healthy, and with an illness like fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue syndrome, it’s especially difficult. I know it’s something I struggle with every day, and a recent comment left by a reader put our common struggle into words really well:

“I still feel like I’m letting my kids down because I’m not able to do/be/have enough energy to give them everything they need. But at least, I guess, they’re learning that when Mom says in answer to, ‘Can we go/do…….?’ ‘It depends on how I’m feeling’ really means just what it says. I try to say ‘yes’ some of the time for little things and make sure I’m able to follow through, but I feel like I’m saying ‘No’ constantly.

I’ve lost many so-called ‘friends’ because of my inability to make plans, but it’s with my children that I *really* feel guilty.”
-A.

Like her, I try to say “yes” and give my children fun times, but unfortunately they have to settle for “I’ll try” far too often.

I’ve said before that we have to learn to accept certain things, and this is another one of those things. It may well be the hardest one to accept, though, because we all want to give our children so much, and it’s hard to think about them missing out on meaningful experiences because mommy or daddy is sick.

While I can’t always choose fun activities for the kids over things like laundry and housework, I do put off the mundane now and then so that I have the energy. I also look for things that they can enjoy that are also low-key for me — a play area at a park or inside the mall, a children’s museum we have in town, places where I can sit and watch them. My kids are also lucky enough to have a dad who’s great about taking them to do stuff while I stay home, or who involves them in household projects and makes it fun.

I don’t know that any of us can ever truly get past feeling like we’re short-changing our children, but I think kids with chronically ill parents probably do learn some valuable skills. My kids have had to be especially self-sufficient and learn to entertain themselves. Having seen kids whose parents do every little thing for them, I’m proud that mine are able to do so much for themselves — and you know what? They’re proud of themselves, as well.

My kids have also learned early that illness is just part of life. They’re very compassionate, and they aren’t uncomfortable around sick or injured people. They’re at the doctor’s office with me enough that it’s not a strange or scary place for them. They’ve even seen acupuncture and cupping performed. I do think it’s possible, however, for kids who are around chronic illness to worry too much about their own minor illnesses and bumps and bruises — that’s something we’re working on with my son.

In some ways, I think it’s been easier on my kids that my fibromyalgia developed when they were little — my son was 4 and my daughter was 1.5. They don’t remember the year I spent laying on the couch in excruciating pain, and they don’t remember when I was healthy. This is just how mom is to them. In my forum, we’ve talked about the differences in how kids react based on age, and it seems like teenagers have the hardest time. That makes sense; they’re going through major changes already, and then all of a sudden a parent can no longer fill the accustomed role. That can create a lot of insecurity. No matter the children’s ages, though, family counseling might be something to consider, so that everyone can work toward acceptance of the situation.

I think we need to remember 2 things when raising children while living with a chronic illness:

1. We cannot judge our parenting skills based on other people’s expectations, and
2. We need to be honest with our children.

I know, number 1 is easier said than done, but it’s crucial. It doesn’t do us any good to beat ourselves up over what we can’t do. I’ve had to ignore my mother, who tells me I “just can’t be on the couch all day” when I’m home with my daughter. It’s easy for her to say that from 670 miles away, when she’s still has the energy at 64 to babysit my niece and nephew, but what can I do about it? Some days, it’s all I can do to provide basic meals for my family, and if I don’t rest in between I won’t even be able to do that. I have to focus on the basics, and anything beyond that is a bonus. Martha Beck, who’s now a life coach (you may have seen her on Oprah) and fibromyalgia advocate says she raised her children from a king-sized bed. Do what you can, and make sure they know they’re loved. That’s all any parent can do.

As for number 2, I think it’s important not to underestimate our children. Now 5 and almost 8, my kids can tell you a lot about anatomy because we’ve always explained as much to them as they could understand. They know I have limitations, they’ve seen what happens when I do too much, and they rarely seem upset when I say, “I can’t.” While just saying that makes me a little sad, I have to wonder if it’s not a good lesson, in a society where instant gratification is the norm.

How has your illness impacted your parenting? How has it effected your children? What has helped? Do other people give you guilt trips over what you can’t do? Leave your comments below!

Article source:  Being a Parent With Fibromyalgia & Chronic Fatigue Syndrome


Further Reading

Living with Fibromyalgia (Overcoming Common Problems) by Christine Craggs-Hinton

The Fibromyalgia Handbook: A 7-Step Program to Halt and Even Reverse Fibromyalgia by Harris H. McIlwain and Debra Fulghum Bruce

Fibromyalgia for Dummies by Roland Staud MD and Christine Adamec

Foods That Help Win the Battle Against Fibromyalgia: Ease Everyday Pain and Fight Fatigue by Deidre Rawlings

Fibromyalgia: Simple Relief Through Movement by Stacie L. Bigelow

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (The Facts) by Frankie Campling and Michael Sharpe

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome for Dummies by Susan R. Lisman M.D. and Karla Dougherty

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Clinical Trial for CFS and FM Now Recruiting


Mayo Clinic Trial of Amygdala Retraining for CFS and FM Now Recruiting

On Jan 11, the Mayo Clinic Rochester (Minnesota) listed “A Pilot Study of Amygdala Retraining Program in Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic Fatigue and Fibromyalgia” with ClinicalTrials.gov.

This six-month trial of Ashok Gupta’s Amygdala Retraining Program™ (www.prohealth.com//library/showArticle.cfm?libid=14508) will include a pilot cohort of 30 patients.

The trial description states:

“The purpose of this pilot study is to gather preliminary data on the efficacy and feasibility of the Amygdala Retraining Program (ARP), a mind-body practice versus a control (C) on fatigue, quality of life and sleep in patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), Chronic Fatigue (CF) and Fibromyalgia (FM).

“CFS, CF and FM are incapacitating disorders characterized by profound fatigue, muscle pain, impaired memory, insomnia, and post-exertional malaise (Fukuda 1994).

“Current literature points to a centrally sensitized state in CFS, CF and FM (Meeus 2007). The Amygdala Retraining Program attempts to retrain this neuronal network through mind-body practices such as cognitive restructuring via neurolinguistic programming, yoga based breathing and simple mindfulness based meditation.

“A case series of 33 patients with CFS and Amygdala Retraining Program reported improvement in 92% of patients with two-thirds of patients reaching 80% to 100% of pre-illness levels of health (Gupta 2009). However, Amygdala Retraining Program has never been formally studied in CFS.

“We propose to gather preliminary data on the efficacy and feasibility of Amygdala Retraining Program versus control on fatigue, quality of life and sleep in 30 patients with CFS, CF and FM. All participants will undergo standard clinical treatment which consist of a 2 day self-management program in the Chronic Fatigue Clinic. Following this, participants will be randomized into the Amygdala Retraining Program or control group. The Amygdala Retraining Program group will receive an additional 2.5 hour training surrounding core concepts of the ARP program. They will then be given the Amygdala Retraining Program DVD program and booklet, to reinforce and continue the practice. They will then receive scheduled bi-monthly phone calls for 3 months from a study investigator for support.

“The control group will receive only standard care. However they will receive a complementary copy of the Amygdala Retraining Program program at the end of the study (6 month time point) as a gift for participation in the study.

“Preliminary data on efficacy will be assessed at baseline, 1, 3 and 6 months using the following validated questionnaires: Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MDFI), Short form-36 (SF36) Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), Epworth Sleep Scale (ESS) and Measure Your Medical Outcome Profile (MYMOP-2).

“Feasibility will be assessed by evaluation of a daily practice log where patients record the total time spent daily in the practice of Amygdala Retraining Program and any specific difficulties they encountered in the practice of the program.”

To read more about the trial and for contact information, go to the ClinicalTrials.gov listing (http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01046370)

Article Source:
Mayo Clinic Trial of Amygdala Retraining for CFS and FM Now Recruiting

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If you reside in the North East of England and have been diagnosed with any of the conditions mentioned in the above article namely CFS, CF and FM and are interested in some half price life coaching sessions please contact me asap.  Offer ends 10am 1 March 2010.

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